What is Financial Exploitation?

Financial exploitation occurs when a person misuses or takes the assets of a vulnerable adult for his/her own personal benefit. This frequently occurs without the explicit knowledge or consent of a senior or disabled adult, depriving him/her of vital financial resources for his/her personal needs.

Assets are commonly taken via forms of deception, false pretenses, coercion, harassment, duress and threats. There is more detailed information about financial exploitation here.

These are commonly reported forms of financial exploitation* reported to Adult Protective Services agencies:

Theft: involves assets taken without knowledge, consent or authorization; may include taking of cash, valuables, medications other personal property.

Fraud: involves acts of dishonestly by persons entrusted to manage assets but appropriate assets for unintended uses; may include falsification of records, forgeries, unauthorized check-writing, and Ponzi-type financial schemes.

Real Estate: involves unauthorized sales, transfers or changes to property title(s); may include unauthorized or invalid changes to estate documents.

Contractor: includes building contractors or handymen who receive payment(s) for building repairs, but fail to initiate or complete project; may include invalid liens by contractors.

Lottery scams: involves payments (or transfer of funds) to collect unclaimed property or “prizes” from lotteries or sweepstakes.

Electronic: includes “phishing” e-mail messages to trick persons into unwittingly surrendering bank passwords; may include faxes, wire transfers, telephonic communications.

Mortgage: includes financial products which are unaffordable or out-of-compliance with regulatory requirements; may include loans issued against property by unauthorized parties.

Investment: includes investments made without knowledge or consent; may include high-fee funds (front or back-loaded) or excessive trading activity to generate commissions for financial advisors.

Insurance: involves sales of inappropriate products, such as a thirty-year annuity for a very elderly person; may include unauthorized trading of life insurance policies.

This piece is posted to explain what sometimes happens as seniors age and run out of money. The dangers of exploitation is sometimes the premise for abuse. We watch for those wishing to take over the elder household building a financial wall against intruders. “Let’s talk about it”, said Warren Strycker. A HECM loan leaves room for relatives but establishes continuing independence as elders can stay in their homes with the financial support they need. Call — let’s talk about it nationwide”,  928 345-1200.

HECM MORTGAGES are regulated by the U.S. Government where counseling is mandated for complete understanding in which family can listen in to protect and support their parents in retirement. Counselors are trained to watch for manipulation of family members in these important discussions.